REPORT: June 4 Member Meeting

LEADERS’ ROUNDTABLE:
Infrastructure Priorities

Introduction

State of the States’ Infrastructure

Recent trends are further disrupting infrastructure planning, including the rapid evolution of technology and increasing urbanization, but also migration to rural areas, climate change, compression of financial returns, and changing consumer preferences.

The Proposed American Jobs Plan

Percent Change in Small Business Revenue*

Role of the States

States Outspend the Federal Government

Discussion

Moderated by

Tom Finneran

Sen. Lee Schoenbeck
Senate President Pro Tempore, South Dakota

South Dakota, with its rural and expanding population, designated broadband access as the key infrastructure need and has already completed its broadband deployment. The next critical need is for a rail line across the state from end to end. More service is required to the middle of the state, and rail would be the best way to meet this need. As the population expands, schools may also be a future infrastructure challenge.

Sen. Greg Treat
Senate President Pro Tempore, Oklahoma

For Oklahoma, rural broadband access also has been the most critical infrastructure need, and the state issued a $42 million tax credit to spur development. Last year, the focus was on bridges; the state invested hundreds of millions of dollars to upgrade bridges.

Broad Need for BroadbandBroadband access for underserved and unserved areas featured as the most critical infrastructure need for a number of states as populations move from cities to more rural settings and new working arrangements, including remote work, developed during COVID-19.

Sen. Page Cortez
President of the Senate, Louisiana

Two years ago, the clean-up funding after the BP Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico brought $750 million to the state, which was invested in infrastructure projects, including rural broadband. South Louisiana sits on the major east-west trucking corridor, linking Los Angeles to Florida. Currently, two bridges and one connector highway are the most critical infrastructure projects. The legislature, which denied a new gasoline tax, is considering making a temporary sales tax permanent to provide funding for these projects.

Sen. Don Harmon
President of the Senate, Illinois

The legislature had passed a $42 billion revitalization bill to address infrastructure needs, but this was delayed due to the revenue shortfall associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The current urgency is replacing lead waterlines, and it is anticipated that federal monies will fund this project.

Sen. Ron Kouchi
President of the Senate, Hawaii

Broadband is the biggest challenge for the islands to accommodate telemedicine and distance learning, and the state is negotiating to get better broadband access. However, another concern is protecting water quality and upgrading services. The state still has 80,000 cesspools, often for homes owned by retirees on fixed incomes. While upgrading sewers and waste water is usually a county problem, additional funding will be required to address this problem.

Some states are tackling water access and waste water infrastructure challenges.

Sen. Michael Shirkey
President of the Senate, Michigan

Sen. Ty Masterson
President of the Senate, Kansas

Sen. Chris Kapenga
President of the Senate, Wisconsin

Sen. Robert Stivers
President of the Senate, Kentucky

Traditional concerns over roads, bridges, and dams still are at the forefront in a number of states. In Kentucky, a $3 billion bridge construction project will be required to span the mile-wide Ohio River and ensure safety for the 70% of America’s trucks that cross the bridge.

Sen. Bill Ferguson
President of the Senate, Maryland

Sen. Dan Dockstader
President of the Senate, Wyoming

Sen. Jeremy Miller
President of the Senate, Minnesota

Sen. Larry Taylor
Chair, Senate Education Committee, Texas

Sen. Tom Alexander
Chair, Senate Labor, Commerce and Industry Committee
South Carolina

Sen. Peter Micciche
President of the Senate, Alaska

Sen. Phil Berger
President of the Senate, North Carolina

Sen. Stuart Adams
President of the Senate, Utah

Sen. Chuck Winder
Senate President Pro Tempore, Idaho

Tom Foukes
BSA: The Software Alliance

Scott Henderson
Covanta

Kevin Fisk
LKQ Corporation

Conclusion

The most prevalent infrastructure priorities noted by the Senate leaders included:

1. Broadband access, especially for rural and underserved metropolitan areas;

2. Aging bridges, highways, and dams that need urgent repairs and upgrades; and

3. Water infrastructure to contain excess, to deliver water to drought-ridden areas, and to dispose of waste water.

Download PDF of article

 

 

 The Forum Welcomes
New Senate Participants
Sen. Dan Dockstader
President of the Senate
(Wyoming)
 Sen. Chris Kapenga
President of the Senate
(Wisconsin)
 

 

 

 

 

 

American Society of Civil Engineers
State Report Cards
Every 4 years, the American Society of Civil Engineers generates “report cards,” grading each state on the condition and performance of its infrastructure. To review details on your state’s grade for 2021, click the map here.

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

 

Tel: 914-693-1818

Copyright © 2020 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.

REPORT: June 4 Member Meeting

LEADERS’ ROUNDTABLE:
Infrastructure Priorities

Introduction

State of the States’ Infrastructure

Recent trends are further disrupting infrastructure planning, including the rapid evolution of technology and increasing urbanization, but also migration to rural areas, climate change, compression of financial returns, and changing consumer preferences.

The Proposed American Jobs Plan

Percent Change in Small Business Revenue*

Role of the States

States Outspend the Federal Government

Discussion

Moderated by

Tom Finneran

Sen. Lee Schoenbeck
Senate President Pro Tempore, South Dakota

South Dakota, with its rural and expanding population, designated broadband access as the key infrastructure need and has already completed its broadband deployment. The next critical need is for a rail line across the state from end to end. More service is required to the middle of the state, and rail would be the best way to meet this need. As the population expands, schools may also be a future infrastructure challenge.

Sen. Greg Treat
Senate President Pro Tempore, Oklahoma

For Oklahoma, rural broadband access also has been the most critical infrastructure need, and the state issued a $42 million tax credit to spur development. Last year, the focus was on bridges; the state invested hundreds of millions of dollars to upgrade bridges.

Broad Need for BroadbandBroadband access for underserved and unserved areas featured as the most critical infrastructure need for a number of states as populations move from cities to more rural settings and new working arrangements, including remote work, developed during COVID-19.

Sen. Page Cortez
President of the Senate, Louisiana

Two years ago, the clean-up funding after the BP Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico brought $750 million to the state, which was invested in infrastructure projects, including rural broadband. South Louisiana sits on the major east-west trucking corridor, linking Los Angeles to Florida. Currently, two bridges and one connector highway are the most critical infrastructure projects. The legislature, which denied a new gasoline tax, is considering making a temporary sales tax permanent to provide funding for these projects.

Sen. Don Harmon
President of the Senate, Illinois

The legislature had passed a $42 billion revitalization bill to address infrastructure needs, but this was delayed due to the revenue shortfall associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The current urgency is replacing lead waterlines, and it is anticipated that federal monies will fund this project.

Sen. Ron Kouchi
President of the Senate, Hawaii

Broadband is the biggest challenge for the islands to accommodate telemedicine and distance learning, and the state is negotiating to get better broadband access. However, another concern is protecting water quality and upgrading services. The state still has 80,000 cesspools, often for homes owned by retirees on fixed incomes. While upgrading sewers and waste water is usually a county problem, additional funding will be required to address this problem.

Some states are tackling water access and waste water infrastructure challenges.

Sen. Michael Shirkey
President of the Senate, Michigan

Sen. Ty Masterson
President of the Senate, Kansas

Sen. Chris Kapenga
President of the Senate, Wisconsin

Sen. Robert Stivers
President of the Senate, Kentucky

Traditional concerns over roads, bridges, and dams still are at the forefront in a number of states. In Kentucky, a $3 billion bridge construction project will be required to span the mile-wide Ohio River and ensure safety for the 70% of America’s trucks that cross the bridge.

Sen. Bill Ferguson
President of the Senate, Maryland

Sen. Dan Dockstader
President of the Senate, Wyoming

Sen. Jeremy Miller
President of the Senate, Minnesota

Sen. Larry Taylor
Chair, Senate Education Committee, Texas

Sen. Tom Alexander
Chair, Senate Labor, Commerce and Industry Committee
South Carolina

Sen. Peter Micciche
President of the Senate, Alaska

Sen. Phil Berger
President of the Senate, North Carolina

Sen. Stuart Adams
President of the Senate, Utah

Sen. Chuck Winder
Senate President Pro Tempore, Idaho

Tom Foukes
BSA: The Software Alliance

Scott Henderson
Covanta

Kevin Fisk
LKQ Corporation

Conclusion

The most prevalent infrastructure priorities noted by the Senate leaders included:

1. Broadband access, especially for rural and underserved metropolitan areas;

2. Aging bridges, highways, and dams that need urgent repairs and upgrades; and

Download PDF of article

 

 

 The Forum Welcomes
New Senate Participants
Sen. Dan Dockstader
President of the Senate
(Wyoming)
 Sen. Chris Kapenga
President of the Senate
(Wisconsin)
 

 

 

 

 

 

American Society of Civil Engineers
State Report Cards
Every 4 years, the American Society of Civil Engineers generates “report cards,” grading each state on the condition and performance of its infrastructure. To review details on your state’s grade for 2021, click the map here.

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

 

Tel: 914-693-1818

Copyright © 2020 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.

REPORT: June 4 Member Meeting

Download PDF of article

LEADERS’ ROUNDTABLE:
Infrastructure Priorities

 The Forum Welcomes New Senate ParticipantsSen. Dan Dockstader
President of the Senate
(Wyoming)
                  Sen. Chris Kapenga
President of the Senate
(Wisconsin)

Introduction

State of the States’ Infrastructure

Recent trends are further disrupting infrastructure planning, including the rapid evolution of technology and increasing urbanization, but also migration to rural areas, climate change, compression of financial returns, and changing consumer preferences.

American Society of Civil Engineers
State Report Cards
Every 4 years, the American Society of Civil Engineers generates “report cards,” grading each state on the condition and performance of its infrastructure. To review details on your state’s grade for 2021, click the map here.

The Proposed American Jobs Plan

Percent Change in Small Business Revenue*

Role of the States

States Outspend the Federal Government

Discussion

Moderated by

Tom Finneran

Sen. Lee Schoenbeck
Senate President Pro Tempore, South Dakota

South Dakota, with its rural and expanding population, designated broadband access as the key infrastructure need and has already completed its broadband deployment. The next critical need is for a rail line across the state from end to end. More service is required to the middle of the state, and rail would be the best way to meet this need. As the population expands, schools may also be a future infrastructure challenge.

Sen. Greg Treat
Senate President Pro Tempore, Oklahoma

For Oklahoma, rural broadband access also has been the most critical infrastructure need, and the state issued a $42 million tax credit to spur development. Last year, the focus was on bridges; the state invested hundreds of millions of dollars to upgrade bridges.

Broad Need for BroadbandBroadband access for underserved and unserved areas featured as the most critical infrastructure need for a number of states as populations move from cities to more rural settings and new working arrangements, including remote work, developed during COVID-19.

Sen. Page Cortez
President of the Senate, Louisiana

Two years ago, the clean-up funding after the BP Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico brought $750 million to the state, which was invested in infrastructure projects, including rural broadband. South Louisiana sits on the major east-west trucking corridor, linking Los Angeles to Florida. Currently, two bridges and one connector highway are the most critical infrastructure projects. The legislature, which denied a new gasoline tax, is considering making a temporary sales tax permanent to provide funding for these projects.

Sen. Don Harmon
President of the Senate, Illinois

The legislature had passed a $42 billion revitalization bill to address infrastructure needs, but this was delayed due to the revenue shortfall associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. The current urgency is replacing lead waterlines, and it is anticipated that federal monies will fund this project.

Sen. Ron Kouchi
President of the Senate, Hawaii

Broadband is the biggest challenge for the islands to accommodate telemedicine and distance learning, and the state is negotiating to get better broadband access. However, another concern is protecting water quality and upgrading services. The state still has 80,000 cesspools, often for homes owned by retirees on fixed incomes. While upgrading sewers and waste water is usually a county problem, additional funding will be required to address this problem.

Some states are tackling water access and waste water infrastructure challenges.

Sen. Michael Shirkey
President of the Senate, Michigan

Sen. Ty Masterson
President of the Senate, Kansas

Sen. Chris Kapenga
President of the Senate, Wisconsin

Sen. Robert Stivers
President of the Senate, Kentucky

Traditional concerns over roads, bridges, and dams still are at the forefront in a number of states. In Kentucky, a $3 billion bridge construction project will be required to span the mile-wide Ohio River and ensure safety for the 70% of America’s trucks that cross the bridge.

Sen. Bill Ferguson
President of the Senate, Maryland

Sen. Dan Dockstader
President of the Senate, Wyoming

Sen. Jeremy Miller
President of the Senate, Minnesota

Sen. Larry Taylor
Chair, Senate Education Committee, Texas

Sen. Tom Alexander
Chair, Senate Labor, Commerce and Industry Committee
South Carolina

Sen. Peter Micciche
President of the Senate, Alaska

Sen. Phil Berger
President of the Senate, North Carolina

Sen. Stuart Adams
President of the Senate, Utah

Sen. Chuck Winder
Senate President Pro Tempore, Idaho

Tom Foukes
BSA: The Software Alliance

Scott Henderson
Covanta

Kevin Fisk
LKQ Corporation

Conclusion

The most prevalent infrastructure priorities noted by the Senate leaders included:

1. Broadband access, especially for rural and underserved metropolitan areas;

2. Aging bridges, highways, and dams that need urgent repairs and upgrades; and

3. Water infrastructure to contain excess, to deliver water to drought-ridden areas, and to dispose of waste water.

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

Tel: 914-693-1818

Copyright © 2020 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.