SPECIAL REPORT: August 12, 2022

Teaching is the Greatest Profession. Here’s Why I Didn’t Pursue It.

A Student’s Perspective

 

Teacher Wage Penalty, by State
(in no state are teachers paid more than other college graduates)

I was encouraged to learn that some states already have programs in place to recruit new educators. But, where they exist, are they reaching the ears of prospective teachers? As a high-schooler, I was engaged in my classes and in my school life and even worked as a teacher’s assistant in my AP United States History class in my senior year. However, I never was alerted to opportunities or incentive programs that would draw me to a career in teaching.

Starting college, I chose a Government major and a path more directed towards a promising financial future. My interest in teaching hasn’t wavered, and if I felt teaching provided more financial stability than other jobs, I would likely pursue that path more seriously. I was encouraged to learn at SPF’s Boulder session that programs exist now and that more are in the works to make teaching a more feasible career path. A highly educated generation of Americans is what will drive us into the future of our country. That can only be accomplished by a workforce of educators who are excited to teach – and are rewarded fairly for their work.

 

 

Daniel Maloof is an intern with the Senate Presidents’ Forum and a rising sophomore studying Government and American Studies at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

 

See SPF’s full report
on the July 2022 Forum here:
IntroductionState Budgets:
A Half-Year Check-In
Real Solutions for
Ending Homelessness
The Crisis in UkraineEducation:
Recovering from COVID Chaos

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

 

914-693-1818   •   info@senpf.com

Copyright © 2022 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.

SPECIAL REPORT: August 12, 2022

SPECIAL REPORT: August 12, 2022

Teaching is the Greatest Profession. Here’s Why I Didn’t Pursue It.

A Student’s Perspective

 

Teacher Wage Penalty, by State
(in no state are teachers paid more than other college graduates)

I was encouraged to learn that some states already have programs in place to recruit new educators. But, where they exist, are they reaching the ears of prospective teachers? As a high-schooler, I was engaged in my classes and in my school life and even worked as a teacher’s assistant in my AP United States History class in my senior year. However, I never was alerted to opportunities or incentive programs that would draw me to a career in teaching.

Starting college, I chose a Government major and a path more directed towards a promising financial future. My interest in teaching hasn’t wavered, and if I felt teaching provided more financial stability than other jobs, I would likely pursue that path more seriously. I was encouraged to learn at SPF’s Boulder session that programs exist now and that more are in the works to make teaching a more feasible career path. A highly educated generation of Americans is what will drive us into the future of our country. That can only be accomplished by a workforce of educators who are excited to teach – and are rewarded fairly for their work.

 

 

Daniel Maloof is an intern with the Senate Presidents’ Forum and a rising sophomore studying Government and American Studies at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

 

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

 

914-693-1818   •   info@senpf.com

Copyright © 2022 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.

Teaching is the Greatest Profession. Here’s Why I Didn’t Pursue It.

A Student’s Perspective

 

Teacher Wage Penalty, by State
(in no state are teachers paid more than other college graduates)

I was encouraged to learn that some states already have programs in place to recruit new educators. But, where they exist, are they reaching the ears of prospective teachers? As a high-schooler, I was engaged in my classes and in my school life and even worked as a teacher’s assistant in my AP United States History class in my senior year. However, I never was alerted to opportunities or incentive programs that would draw me to a career in teaching.

Starting college, I chose a Government major and a path more directed towards a promising financial future. My interest in teaching hasn’t wavered, and if I felt teaching provided more financial stability than other jobs, I would likely pursue that path more seriously. I was encouraged to learn at SPF’s Boulder session that programs exist now and that more are in the works to make teaching a more feasible career path. A highly educated generation of Americans is what will drive us into the future of our country. That can only be accomplished by a workforce of educators who are excited to teach – and are rewarded fairly for their work.

 

 

Daniel Maloof is an intern with the Senate Presidents’ Forum and a rising sophomore studying Government and American Studies at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania.

 

CONTACT US

Senate Presidents’ Forum

579 Broadway

Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706

914-693-1818   •   info@senpf.com

Copyright © 2022 Senate Presidents' Forum. All rights reserved.